Tag Archives: Painting

Back on track.

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It’s been a while, I admit it, it has been too long. But today I decided to get back on track. One year has past without a painting or drawing has been made, which gives me the perfect opportunity to start with a clean slate (new work below), to start over with a brand new perspective and most of all: new stories to share with new people who might care.

I’m sorry it took this long.
Have a great day

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The reclining nude (or naked?).

Henri Gervex – Rolla – 1878

Nakedness reveals itself. Nudity is placed on display. The nude is condemned to never being naked. Nudity is a form of dress. – John Berger

Based upon a poem by Alfred de Musset (1810-1857), this reclining nude which belongs to the early work of Henri Gervex (1852-1829), who’s birthday it would have been today (160), which(his early works) belonged almost exclusively to the ‘mythological’ genre. Although it is (or should represent) a mythological painting, the lady reclining on the bed is most certainly not a Venus (as told in the poem). Based upon the pile of cloths, the half dressed gentlemen standing at the balcony I could imagine her being a prostitute, reclining and resting after a wild a sensual game of love. The gentlemen still looking upon the beautiful lady laying in (his) bed.

Do you regret the age when, in majestic grace, Fair heaven amid the gods made earth her dwell- ing-place ; When Venus Astarte, child of the mighty sea, Rose from the bitter wave in virgin purity? The time, when drifting nymphs lay on the river’s breast, And with their wanton laughter vexed the lazy rest Of fauns stretched out to sleep upon the reedy shore? When in the pool Narcissus his fair image saw, And when great Hercules eternal justice dealt, Clad in his gory mantle of a lion’s pelt; When mocking satyrs swayed the leafy boughs among, Whistling a jeering echo to the traveler’s song? – Alfred de Musset; Rolla

Although most likely not a Venus, she does have the perfect body, heavenly white skin which could refer to the earlier works of Titian. A voluptuous body of a young lady, reclining on a bed, staring directly at the viewing audience and not in a coy manner, almost as if she invites us to join her.

His work (Gervex) is also clearly influenced by Cabanel (1823 – 1889), which was his teacher. Which can be noticed in the same use of lightly, fresh colors, the white and pure skin, even the breasts are almost exactly the same. Thematically on the other hand there are almost no comparisons possible, except for the ‘venus’ which is shown on both paintings. It should be said that both painting’s mythological theme’s were only an excuse to paint a nude. Therefor there is a difference between a ‘naked‘ and a ‘nude‘. Gervex clearly painted a ‘naked’. Titian a nude. 

A. Cabanel- The birth of Venus -1863

Reclining nude (photo)- artist unknown

Berlinde de Bruyckere

I’d also like to show the comparison made with the work of a contemporary belgian artist (which I shall be reviewing later on).

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Work In progress (Ghent)

To give some information on the dimension of this project; 220cm x 100cm.  (86inch. x 39.4inch.)

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Black is not a color.

The Balcony  – 1869 –  Oil on canvas, 170 x 124 cm – Musee d’Orsay, Paris – E. Manet.

The artists whome’s paintings could be considered as the genesis of Modern art would eventually become modern art. Edouard Manet, possibly the greatest among impressionist painters, we could even see him as the founder for that matter.

This painting might appeal as realistic portrait of bourgeois life. Yet this is not the case, all the models used in this painting were acquaintances of the artist, especially Berthe Morisot (the girl sitting in the foreground), who makes her first appearance in Manet’s work, who went on to become one of it’s favorite models.

“Color is a matter of taste and of sensitivity”- E. Manet

What was even less conventional for that time, which was a time where academical constraints were still in play, and “good” painters were those who belong to the academy and therefor painted so. But Manet was radically freeing himself from these constraints by not showing any story or anecdote; it seems like the protagonists are frozen, “as if isolated in an interior dream”.

He tried to free himself, despite the reference tot Goya’s Majas at the Balcony (See below) which the artist could have most likely seen during his trip to spain in 1865. Goya treated his protagonist in a more sinister manner (watched by two man in the background, dark surroundings). The two girls are dressed like majas, which in other paintings of his would refer to prostitutes.

Majas on a Balcony – Francisco de Goya y Lucientes – Oil on canvas –   1810-1812

As Manet was surely to be inspired by Goya, so was Manet an inspiration to later painters, as his paintings were to be considered as the genesis of modern art . Less then a century later this happens..

Manet’s Balcony – Rene Magritte – 1950 -Oil on Canvas.

“Everything we see hides another thing, we always want to see what is hidden by what we see.” – R. Magritte

This work belongs to a series of paintings; “the perspective paintings”. Magritte based these paintings on well-known works by french artists (Jacques Louis David, Éduoard Manet, François Gerard). The painting is executed in Magritte’s carefully detailed style and might be seen as an irreverent rendition of the neoclassical masterpiece which is suffused with mordant wit. This must be a statement right? Did he just kill, buried Manet? Or rather the subjects that used to be on the painting? As I’m living/ studying in Ghent, where this painting is shown, I have the privilege of seeing it whenever I like and I have to be honest; it strikes me every single time.. It seems to embody this morbid atmosphere, but yet such cool, calming colors.. It’s confusing, it makes me think, it makes good art.

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When I’ll know your soul I paint your eyes.

Jeanne Hebuterne

Let’s admit it. He had good taste, look at her, an astonishingly beautiful young lady, who would become the subject of it’s biggest masterpiece. His name was Amedeo Modigliani‘a crazy italian fuck.’. Whose bohemian life could’ve been seen as a result of many different aspects. First of all it was expected of artists of that time, secondly it was the time where radical philosophies arose, including those of Nietzsche. Eventually it got the man killed at the early age of 36. Even among other bohemians his behavior stood out; he would sometimes strip himself naked at social gatherings, making a scene. He became the epitome of a tragic artist, he became the new Vincent van Gogh.

“(hold sacred all) which can exalt and excite your intelligence… (and) … seek to provoke … and to perpetuate … these fertile stimuli, because they can push the intelligence to its maximum creative power.”

But instead, let’s not talk about the artist, I’d rather tell you about his mistress, goddess, lover and most important subject in Modigliani’s life. I present to you; Jeanne Hébuterne , she was a 19 year old art student when she first met Amedeo, unlike the artist she descended from a conservative bourgeois background. Although her family renounced her affaire with the drunken, poor artist, who had almost no income at all, she decided to move in with him. Their public scene’s became even more renowned than Modigliani’s individual drunken exhibitions.

“When I’ll know your soul, I’ll paint your eyes, and he eventually did. Take a look at these remarkable paintings and notice the eyes.

Amedeo Modigliani – 1918 – MET (NY) – Oil on Canvas. Portrait of Jeanne Hebuterne.

And then all of a sudden this happened.. He painted her eyes. He knew her soul. This touches me in every single way, the gesture by itself embodies beauty and passion. Passion for life, she gave birth to their first child, which she named Jeanne. She got pregnant a second time, but the child would never see daylight… Tragedy and Beauty seem to go hand in hand. The inevitable happened …

Amedeo Modigliani- Jeanne Hebuterne– 1919 – Oil on Canvas

…. on 24 january 1920 Modigliani died, totally distraught, she threw herself out of the fifth-floor apartment window the day after his death, killing herself together with her unborn child

“Devoted companion to the extreme sacrifice – epitath Hebuterne”

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This is Belgium. (Not chocolate)

Michaël Borremans  & Luc Tuymans. 

As i was going through my books this afternoon I couldn’t resist to show and  introduce you to Belgian art. Therefor I chose these two artists who are two of my favorite contemporary painters in Belgium. I love the misty colors, the hard themes, shocking maybe? The light that seems to burst out into the darkness. I also couldn’t stop noticing that there was a certain resemblance when watching both artist’s works. I hope you enjoy them as much as I did.

The Pendant – 2010 – Oil on canvas – Michaël Borremans 

 Der Diagnostische Blick VII – 1992 – 65,5 x 45,5 cm – oil on canvas – Luc Tuymans 


Luc Tuymans, Panel, 2010, oil on canvas, 92 1/4 x 71 1/2 inches, courtesy David Zwirner, New York.

Michaël Borremans, Trickland, 2002, courtesy Eeno X Gallery, Antwerpen

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Oh dear, I’m addicted.

To be honest, this is becoming an addiction, didn’t know that writing could be so interesting.. The self reflection, reaching people all over the world, wow this is AMAZING.

Anyway, I’m planning to do a review on this really brilliant contemporary artist Brett Amory, if i had a choice I would do it right now, as my fingers are tingling to begin. But … As I’m an art student I’m obliged to study. Which is fun as well.. learning about all these different artists and .. you know. I might believe that i’ve found my calling..

So stay tuned, I’ll be back very SOON.

thanks all for reading and liking my posts,
REALLY APPRECIATE  IT!.

Greetings Olivier.

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“My paint is like a rocket, which describes its own space”

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91 years, this is how old this marvelous painter would’ve become today. He only passed away 6 years ago but it’s oeuvre seems to tremble the foundations of art and post-modernism. I’d like to refer to a previous post where I discusses this artist in detail: “The painter versus it’s canvas

“I don’t paint, I hit.”

Dear mr Appel, you fought well earning your proper name in the history of arts.
You shall not be forgotten.

“The duty of the artist is not to be calculating in any sense, so that he may be free himself of human emotions while carried by the universal forces of life. Only then does one not think about making art, or about styles, or directions. Something comes about, something happens.”

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The pursuit of Art.

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First of all, for all of those that are still awake or just got up: good morning! (7;58 AM here). Anyway today I’ll be discussing some quite interesting topics. Let’s line them up for a moment:

  • Willem De Kooning would’ve been 108 years old today so I’ll be reviewing a few of his works, commenting it’s style and give my own perspective on his “oeuvre” (to use some fancy words early in the morning) – “The king of Abstract Expressionism
  • Then I’ll TRY to give my point of view to what I truly believe to be Art and how Art seems to exist. The future of art, and last but not least; “why you should love art!”.

“I Do not deny that I have made drawings and watercolors of an erotic nature. But there are always works of Art. Are there no artists who have done erotic pictures?” – Egon Schiele

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-Enter the ‘Artscape’.

So I decided to continue my journey further into the belgian art scene, to be precise; Flanders. Which brought me to this young artist. Since I first noticed his works a few months ago I was convinced that it was good art to me and therefor according to my criteria what makes art; ‘good’ art.

Again (*) there seems to be a certain vivid and mysterious thought, aspect related to these paintings. When taking a first glance at them, everything seems quite realistic and rather ordinary .. but then…All of a sudden something seems incorrect, objects seem misplaced or certain situations impossible? It appears to me like if these “events” are taking place where reality and a dream seem to cross each other. It’s the vague borderline, the crossing between both which is depicted here.

“Everything seems vague all of a sudden, for one moment the world seemed to have collapsed and reorganized in a non-conventional fashion., what happened here? ” 

Although it’s painted in a very realistic manner, the picture shown isn’t. What happened here? Everything seems vague al of a sudden, the roof became the floor, walls are moving, the world appears to have collapsed, where after it has reorganized itself in a non conventional fashion. These paintings make me remind the surrealistic paintings, freud’s unconsciousness, the dream, but it might as well be a nightmare?

Another aspect that really strikes me concerning these works is the way that he paints them; Although everything seems to be in constant motion, the way it’s painted is rather soothing, which makes it even more confusing and in a certain way: ‘disturbing’ and ‘peaceful’ at the same time. 

I do believe these works are very intriguing and fascinating, they make me wonder of to a certain place where everything, just for a moment, seems clear in simple. I’m anxious to find out what the artist himself has to say about his works and wether they mean something more or not.

What is the artist trying to say, or isn’t he? Is there a certain message hidden in these surreal interiors and landscapes? It makes us think, which art should always do! Is it an indirect reference to certain feelings, is he confused, maybe a different look upon the world? Is it criticism, or simply a mind trick?

“You see things; and you say, ‘Why?’ But I dream things that never were; and I say, ‘Why not?”

 


 * The Residence of art – An “Invisible Beauty”

More  info;

All works belong to;

-Hans Temmerman-

website : www.hanstemmerman.be

Recently his work got selected for an important contemporary art “competition” in Belgium: “De Canvascollectie

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